Home » The Inquisitive Introvert Blog » tlc book tours

Tagged tlc book tours

The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes

Book Review :: The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes

First line: “The Silver Fox was waiting for me in a back booth at Wan-Q, the retro nonchic Cantonese restaurant that was two doors down from the rear entrance to the Essex House on West Fifty-Sixth Street.”

The Girl With Kaleidoscope EyesAfter a twenty-year hiatus, ghostwriter Stewart Hoag and his four-legged side-kick Lulu are back. Full disclosure: I haven’t read any of the eight earlier books in this series, but now I want to hunt them down and explore the early years.

Stewart “Hoagy” Hoag is a ghostwriter. Years ago he wrote his own bestselling novel but then the well ran dry. Now he’s helping others get the notoriety, and his agent has a new job for him–one with personal connections. Reggie Aintree is a successful poet, Hoagy’s former flame and the woman he dedicated his single novel to. She also happens to be the daughter of Richard Aintree who also wrote one novel. The difference between Richard and Hoagy is the fact that Richard’s novel is taught in all high school English classes. Well that and Richard vanished after his wife’s suicide; he hasn’t been seen since.

Add into the Aintree family mix Monette, Reggie’s sister. Monette is a media mogul currently separated from her wildly popular actor husband, Patrick Van Pelt. And Monette believes she has just received a letter from her long-lost father. Enter Hoagy whose been summoned to ghostwrite the tell-all that could potentially arise from the return of Richard Aintree. Begrudgingly he packs his bags and heads out to Los Angeles, taking up residence in Monette’s beach house as they await the return of the infamous Aintree patriarch. Let murder and mayhem commence.

Set in 1992, David Handler takes me back down memory lane in The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes through new fangled mobile phones, references and allusions to the decade’s pop culture (90210 anyone?), and the emerging popularity of word processors. But the universal absurdity of celebrity chaos required me to regularly remind myself it was 1992.  Handler’s characters are as colorful as the book’s title and his humorous depictions of Lulu, especially her eating and sleeping habits, exude authenticity. As a dog lover, I appreciate that Lulu isn’t forgotten. If Hoagy’s eating on a restaurant patio, Lulu is laying at his feet. When he’s driving, she’s in the car. She doesn’t just vanish with no explanation of where she is or how she got there.

Some of the police procedure seems a little questionable, but I’m not an expert and the plot isn’t supposed to be a serious crime story. It’s light-hearted and fun with some weightier themes around drugs and relationships that are the real crux of the book.

Handler doesn’t leave his readers wondering what people or places look like nor what meals consist of. But as long as you can get past the excess detail, The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes is an enjoyable, fast-paced mystery chock full of Hollywood, humor and havoc. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m headed to find the earlier books in this series.

The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes is available in paperback and ebook from William Morrow.

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

My review is the first of the TLC Book Tour for The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes. You can find out what others have to say about this fun mystery by visiting the tour page at TLC’s website. You can also find David Handler on Facebook.

Book Review - How to be Everything

Book Review :: How To Be Everything

First line: “If you’ve picked up this book, it’s probably because you’ve had trouble narrowing down ‘what you want to be’ to one thing.”

Book Review - How to be EverythingGrowing up, I knew for certain I wanted to be a teacher, a lawyer, an architect. When I started college, I was in a program for architecture. When I graduated I received a degree in English and sports medicine. I also was only a few credits away from minors in nutrition, psychology and religion. I just loved to learn. There were very few classes I took that I didn’t devour. And the classes I didn’t like usually had more to do with the instructor and how he/she presented it than the material itself.

Since college, I’ve worked as a cast member for The Disney Store, a receptionist/administrative assistant, a high school English teacher, a technical writer, a coordinator of online learning, a webmaven, a book reviewer and a virtual assistant. Whenever I had to go through the torture of a job search, I didn’t know what to look for. I have a lot of skills–good skills–but I never had a specialization that helped determine the job title I needed to enter in the search engine. Heck, I didn’t even know what that job title was. So when I learned about Emilie Wapnick’s book How To Be Everything: A Guide for Those Who (Still)Don’t Know What They Want To Be When They Grow Up, I knew I had to read it.

How To Be Everything is a mix of therapy and self-help. Therapy in the sense that it’s reassuring to know there are other multipotentialites (someone with many interests and creative pursuits) out there. I’m not an alien. I don’t have career ADD–well, maybe I do, but others do as well, and there’s nothing wrong with that. In fact, multipotentialites, in general, have some darn impressive superpowers: idea synthesis, rapid learning, adaptability, big picture thinking, and relating and translating. How To Be Everything is self-help in the sense that it provides exercises and activities to assist readers in identifying their goals and work styles and how to pursue them.

In true multipotentialite fashion, I have some characteristics several work styles: the Group Hug Approach–I’m definitely overwhelmed when there are too many disconnected projects–the Einstein Approach–there isn’t enough time for the hobbies I enjoy–and the Phoenix Approach–when I get obsessed with something, I want to know everything there is to know about it. The one that didn’t match my personality hardly at all was the Slash Approach. And ironically, that’s probably what best defines my current employment situation: webmaven/virtual assistant/freelance writer/….

How To Be Everything will hook any multipotentialite floundering for a foothold in a society that doesn’t quite recognize their strengths. It will provide direction for those grasping at job titles to enter in their search engines. Informally written but informationally-rich, How To Be Everything puts the audience at ease. And let’s face it, if you’re job searching, stress is probably at a pretty high level, so ease is welcome. Even if you aren’t job searching, having a sense of direction is reassuring; knowing you’re a member of the club is priceless. The reading goes quickly but to milk this gem for all it’s worth, bring your pencil and put some time into the questions and activities. I’m certainly discovering a rich pay-off.

How To Be Everything is available in hardcover from HarperOne.

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

My review today of How To Be Everything is part of the TLC blog tour. You can discover what other bloggers are saying about it by checking out the complete tour schedule here.

Dual Book Review :: The Wisdom of Moms & Amazing Dads

I‘m kind of addicted to National Geographic books. It’s probably partly due to my love of photography. National Geographic sure knows how to do photography. Today I have two gorgeous little gift books to share with you just in time to pay tribute to the moms and dads in your lives.

The Wisdom of Moms: Love and Lessons From the Animal Kingdom

First line: “Moms can be feathered or furry, they can live in the mountains, at the water’s edge, or in the desert.”

The Wisdom of MomsThis little gem is chock full of glorious, color images of mothers and their offspring in the animal kingdom, among them a flamingo, bulldog, owl, dolphin and one of my personal favorites, the meerkat. The images are accompanied by little facts about the species and their parenting practices as well as lovely quotes related to parenthood, motherhood, love and life. Spread out throughout the book are short sections on characteristics of mothers, such as loyalty, compassion and grit. The narrative tells how the corresponding animal displays that trait.

The images are awe-worthy and the quotes are well-chosen. The variety of animals gracing the pages is terrific fun. Some regulars we expect to see everywhere–the graceful giraffe–and some that aren’t so common–free-range pigs! The Wisdom of Moms is a treasure for any animal lover, but it’s certainly the perfect gift this Mother’s Day. I’m not sure I can part with my copy of this one, though, so I will have to go get another one for my mother.

One of my favorite quotes from the collection is from Barbara Schapiro, “Sometimes the laughter in mothering is the recognition of the ironies and absurdities. Sometimes, though, it’s just pure, unthinking delight.” The Wisdom of Moms is certainly pure delight, but instead of unthinking it’ll have you pondering your own mom, guaranteed.

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

 

Amazing Dads: Love and Lessons From the Animal Kingdom

First line: “There is that one special person who is always your biggest fan, your most tireless coach, and your friend no matter what: your dad.”

Amazing DadsThe companion book to The Wisdom of Moms is Amazing Dads. Set up in the same format, the book is packed with beautiful, bold images of animals throughout the world. The jacana and its spindly little off-spring practically tweet from the page. Meanwhile, it’s hard not to conjure up memories of Nemo as the brilliantly orange clownfish pop in their sea of blue.  The quotes range from heartwarming to humorous. And the facts accompanying the images are fascinating. Did you know that a male Japanese puffer fish spends nine days drawing intricate sand patterns on the ocean floor? Then the female deposits her eggs in the center. From hedgehogs to eagles, parenting in the wild is stunning, entertaining and magical. Amazing Dads captures that beautifully.

Either book will make beautiful gifts, but the pair complement each other wonderfully. Anyone who loves one with cherish the other…take it from me, I’m not relinquishing mine. National Geographic knows how to engage an audience with sharp, striking pictures and both The Wisdom of Moms and Amazing Dads are well-endowed with those images. And you really can’t beat the price on these little beauties either. Be sure to check them out!

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

My reviews of The Wisdom of Moms and Amazing Dads is the kick-off post of the TLC Book Tour these great gift books. You can find out what other bloggers think about them by following the tour, listed here.

Book Review :: The Compassionate Achiever

I have to apologize. I was supposed to get this review posted last week and was on track to do just that, then everything got overwhelming. So, a little late, but hopefully still doing it the justice it deserves, I present to you The Compassionate Achiever: How Helping Others Fuels Success by Christopher L. Kukk.

First line: “My wife, Elly, and I were on an elevated train traveling home after spending the day in Boston, when a loud blast fractured the silence of the car.”

The Compassionate AchieverUsing a slew of science combined with a hearty dose of anecdotes and topped with a smidgen of analytical thinking, Dr. Christopher Kukk illustrates how the old adage, “look out for number one” is not really the secret to success. Instead, individuals need to be compassionate achievers if they hope to sustain meaningful success. By practicing compassion people will see more constructive relationships, improved intelligence, and increased resiliency.

Kukk makes it a point to emphasize that when he talks about practicing compassion, “recognizing a problem or caring about another’s pain and making a commitment to help, he isn’t saying they should become door mats. It’s possible to have compassion without sacrificing yourself in the process.

Kukk has devised a four-step process to cultivate the compassion he defines and illustrates in part one of the book. Part two breaks down the four steps: Listen to Learn, Understand to Know, Connect to Capabilities and Act to Solve. And the final section of the book highlights the ripple effect of one’s work from Part 2.

Kukk’s obvious passion for his compassion plan is contagious. It’s motivating and hopeful. His positive presentation of the content will invigorate readers to give it a try in their own lives and be more cognizant of the behaviors that hinder it. He explains that “Compassion, like love, is a positive-sum game: by giving more, you get more. Your compassion reserves can never be depleted within you.” And Kukk offers ideas for how his audience can work on the skills necessary to master the steps of compassion.

The analogies and simple daily behaviors that Kukk offers makes becoming a compassionate achiever seem attainable for anyone if they open themselves up to the concept. The rewards are plentiful both intrinsically and extrinsically. It’s had a powerful effect on me, and I feel as though our current political climate and it’s trickle-down effect make this the perfect time for people to be picking up The Compassionate Achiever.  It really should be required reading for everyone.

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

My review today of The Compassionate Achiever is part of the TLC blog tour. You can discover what other bloggers are saying about it by checking out the complete tour schedule here.

The Color of Our Sky

Book Review :: The Color of Our Sky

First line: “The memory of that moment hit me like a surging ocean wave—drawing me into it—the sour smell of darkness, those sobs erupting like an echo from a bottomless pit.”

The Color of Our SkyMukta was born to a devdasis, a temple prostitute,  in her Indian village of Ganipur. Tradition held that as a female off-spring, she too would become a devdasis. Her mother, however, wanted nothing more than to break the evil cycle and free her daughter from this life of daily horror.

Tara was born to upper caste Brahmins from the same village. Because their parents didn’t approve of the marriage, Tara’s parents were forced to elope, fleeing their village to live in Mumbai. But Tara was still afforded all the benefits of her upper caste heritage: an education, a nice home, plenty to eat.

When Mukta’s mother dies at the hands of the villagers, Tara’s father takes Mukta away to Mumbai. He has helped many homeless orphans so Tara thinks nothing of Mukta coming to stay with them. But Mukta stays longer than the other children. Tara’s mother teaches her to clean the house, cook and escort Tara to school. In short, she treats her like a servant. But Tara teaches Mukta to read, she befriends her and the girls grow close.  Until a bomb in the bazaar blows their contented life into a million pieces.

The Color of Our Sky is the story of these two young Indian girls whose families came from the same village. Told in their alternating first person voices from the mid-1980s to 2008, it’s heartbreaking and hopeful, unthinkable and uplifting. Amita Trasi’s story canvas shines brilliantly with the colors of her rich characters, the power of her themes, her beautiful setting and optimism. The dark strokes of evil, hate, greed and desperation also add to the magnetism.

I finished The Color of Our Sky reminded of each human’s extraordinary value. Race, gender, caste or class, age, sexual orientation, none of it makes us better or worse than someone else. Those are simply traits that fate drops in our laps. We don’t control those things. Our compassion, empathy, generosity and kindness are the true measures of a good human being.  We have the power to change these things, and how we choose to wield that power tells the world all it needs to know.

The Color of Our Sky is far from a light beach read, but since we all still have time before the summer season really hits us—at least here in the U.S. anyway—there’s plenty of opportunity to luxuriate in the depth and breadth of this incredible debut from Amita Trasi.

Goodreads - Brown Dog Solutions

My review today of The Color of Our Sky is part of the TLC blog tour. You can discover what other bloggers are saying about it by checking out the complete tour schedule here.

Orphan Train

Book review :: Orphan Train

First line: “I believe in ghosts.”

Orphan Train
In 2013 readers first discovered Christina Baker Kline’s Orphan Train. I was not among them. I guess you could say, I missed that train. And it’s very rare these day for me to be able to circle back on a book I missed when it came out, but this TLC Book Tour for the revised paperback edition of Orphan Train allowed me to do just that. And I’m thankful for the opportunity. What a wonderful novel.

Niamh Power is only nine years old when a fire takes her father and siblings and leaves her mother in a mental institution. It’s 1929 in New York City and the Children’s Aid Society transports orphans west–via train–to families that will take them in. Niamh, a red-haired Irish immigrant, is one of the orphans caught up in this system.

Molly Ayer is in a similar situation in Spruce Harbor Maine in 2011. While there is no longer an orphan train, Molly is stuck in the foster system. Her father died in a car accident and her mother spiraled into addiction issues leaving her unable to care for Molly. She’s close to aging out of the system, but when she tries to steal an old tattered copy of Jane Eyre from the library and is caught, she’s left in a serious predicament: serve community service hours or juvie time.  Molly’s boyfriend Jack manages to arrange the community service time with his mother’s employer, an old woman named Vivian Daly who needs to clean out her attic.

As Molly helps Vivian go through her belongings in the attic, she learns the story of the red-haired Irish immigrant who traveled on the orphan train in Depression-era America, and a special bond forms.

Orphan Train is a beautiful, disturbing, haunting historical novel that spotlights humanity’s basest creatures and its most compassionate.  The story illustrates the power of determination and the human ability to overcome life’s harshest storms with the support of others. Kline’s atmosphere thickly envelopes readers, laying them on an old, moldy, infested mattresses on the ground or trudging them through a snow storm.

Kline has a letter at the opening of the novel indicating that she’s added to a scene that she received many letters about. Not having read the original version, I wasn’t able to discern where this addition was made. It is seamless and causes no bumps in the plot. Those who have read the book previously may want to venture back and see how the addition affects their reading of the women’s stories.

If, like me, you missed the Orphan Train before now, I encourage you to pick it up. This is definitely a train you’ll be glad you jumped aboard.